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Less Is More: Don't Overthink Your Wellness Program

Less Is More: Don't Overthink Your Wellness Program
From Recruiter - September 6, 2017

Today, many employers are tasked with preserving and promoting the health and happiness of their employees. As a result, much attention is paid to perks beyond healthcare and 401(k) benefits. Wellness leaders are responding, offering a wide variety of lifestyle improvement and chronic disease management programs while exploring everything from flexible work arrangements to pet insurance.

In truth, however, our employee wellness programsdont have to be so complicated.

A good wellness program improves the health and happiness of individuals. While many programs influence behaviors outside of the office, the fastest way to have an impact is to create an office space that promotes wellness during the workday.

The office environment impacts the health and wellbeing of employees in more ways than one, whether by poor air quality, limited access to nutritious food, or chair-biased work routines. To promote healthier workforces, organizations of every size and structure should be doing one thing: embracing a culture of movement.

A staggering number of corporate workersspend the majority of the dayapproximately 12.3 hours sitting. This daily routineis bad for individuals, and its bad for business.

Studiesshow that prolonged sitting increases the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and death. People who sit for more than 11 hours a day have a 40 percent higher risk of death in the next three years than people who sit for less than four hours. Sitting can also harm our mental health, interfering with our focus, upping our stress levels, and increasing therisk of anxiety and depression.

When offices do encourage movement,the realities of the workday rarely reflect said encouragement. Some employees will inevitably put their health on the back burner in order to meet deadlines and manage responsibilities. Plus, the habit of sitting is a deeply ingrained one. Absent theconscious choiceto introduce and encourage more movement to the workplace, employees will default to the behaviors the office has always reinforced.



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